Weather
The Pine Tree, News for Calaveras County and Beyond Weather
Amador Angels Camp Arnold Bear Valley Copperopolis Murphys San Andreas Valley Springs Moke Hill/West Point Tuolumne
News
Business Directory
Weather & Roads
Sports
Real Estate
Search
Weekly & Grocery Ads
Entertainment
Life & Style
Government
Law Enforcement
Business
Wine News
Health & Fitness
Home & Garden
Food & Dining
Religion & Faith
Frogtown USA
Calendar
Polls
Columns
Free Classifieds
Letters to the Editor
Obituaries
About Us


Search Announcements




Log In
Username

Password

Remember Me



Posted by: thepinetree on 05/11/2022 08:36 AM Updated by: thepinetree on 05/11/2022 08:49 AM
Expires: 01/01/2027 12:00 AM
:

Rate of Inflation Slows, Still Climbed 0.3% in Urban Areas, Impact Worse in Rural Areas. Inflation at 8.3% Annually

Washington, DC...The Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers (CPI-U) increased 0.3 percent in April on a seasonally adjusted basis after rising 1.2 percent in March, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. Over the last 12 months, the all items index increased 8.3 percent before seasonal adjustment. Increases in the indexes for shelter, food, airline fares, and new vehicles were the largest contributors to the seasonally adjusted all items increase. The food index rose 0.9 percent over the month as the food at home index rose 1.0 percent. The energy index declined in April after rising in recent months. The index for gasoline fell 6.1 percent over the month, offsetting increases in the indexes for natural gas and electricity.




The index for all items less food and energy rose 0.6 percent in April following a 0.3-percent
advance in March. Along with indexes for shelter, airline fares, and new vehicles, the indexes
for medical care, recreation, and household furnishings and operations all increased in April.
The indexes for apparel, communication, and used cars and trucks all declined over the month.

The all items index increased 8.3 percent for the 12 months ending April, a smaller increase
than the 8.5-percent figure for the period ending in March. The all items less food and energy
index rose 6.2 percent over the last 12 months. The energy index rose 30.3 percent over the last
year, and the food index increased 9.4 percent, the largest 12-month increase since the period
ending April 1981.
Table A. Percent changes in CPI for All Urban Consumers (CPI-U): U.S. city average 






Seasonally adjusted changes from preceding month Un-
adjusted
12-mos.
ended
Apr. 2022
Oct.
2021
Nov.
2021
Dec.
2021
Jan.
2022
Feb.
2022
Mar.
2022
Apr.
2022

All items

0.9 0.7 0.6 0.6 0.8 1.2 0.3 8.3

Food

0.9 0.8 0.5 0.9 1.0 1.0 0.9 9.4

Food at home

0.9 0.9 0.4 1.0 1.4 1.5 1.0 10.8

Food away from home(1)

0.8 0.6 0.6 0.7 0.4 0.3 0.6 7.2

Energy

3.7 2.4 0.9 0.9 3.5 11.0 -2.7 30.3

Energy commodities

4.7 4.2 1.3 -0.6 6.7 18.1 -5.4 44.7

Gasoline (all types)

4.6 4.5 1.3 -0.8 6.6 18.3 -6.1 43.6

Fuel oil(1)

12.3 3.5 -2.4 9.5 7.7 22.3 2.7 80.5

Energy services

2.4 0.2 0.3 2.9 -0.4 1.8 1.3 13.7

Electricity

1.4 0.2 0.5 4.2 -1.1 2.2 0.7 11.0

Utility (piped) gas service

5.9 0.3 -0.3 -0.5 1.5 0.6 3.1 22.7

All items less food and energy

0.6 0.5 0.6 0.6 0.5 0.3 0.6 6.2

Commodities less food and energy commodities

1.1 0.9 1.2 1.0 0.4 -0.4 0.2 9.7

New vehicles

1.3 1.2 1.2 0.0 0.3 0.2 1.1 13.2

Used cars and trucks

2.5 2.4 3.3 1.5 -0.2 -3.8 -0.4 22.7

Apparel

0.6 0.7 1.1 1.1 0.7 0.6 -0.8 5.4

Medical care commodities(1)

0.6 0.1 0.0 0.9 0.3 0.2 0.1 2.1

Services less energy services

0.4 0.4 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 4.9

Shelter

0.5 0.5 0.4 0.3 0.5 0.5 0.5 5.1

Transportation services

0.2 0.7 0.0 1.0 1.4 2.0 3.1 8.5

Medical care services

0.4 0.3 0.3 0.6 0.1 0.6 0.5 3.5

Footnotes (1) Not seasonally adjusted.

Food

The food index increased 0.9 percent in April; this was its seventeenth consecutive monthly
increase. The index for food at home rose 1.0 percent after rising 1.5 percent the prior month.
Five of the six major grocery store food group indexes increased over the month. The index for
dairy and related products rose 2.5 percent, its largest monthly increase since July 2007. The
index for nonalcoholic beverages also rose sharply, increasing 2.0 percent over the month. The
index for meats, poultry, fish, and eggs rose 1.4 percent as the index for eggs increased 10.3
percent in April.

The index for cereals and bakery products increased 1.1 percent over the month, and the index for
other food at home rose 0.7 percent. In contrast to these increases, the index for fruits and
vegetables declined in April, falling 0.3 percent. The index for fresh fruits declined 0.5
percent, while the index for fresh vegetables was unchanged.

The food away from home index rose 0.6 percent in April after rising 0.3 percent in March. The
index for full service meals rose 0.9 percent over the month. The index for limited service
meals increased 0.3 percent in April after declining in March.

The food at home index rose 10.8 percent over the last 12 months, the largest 12-month increase
since the period ending November 1980. The index for meats, poultry, fish, and eggs increased
14.3 percent over the last year, the largest 12-month increase since the period ending May 1979.
The other major grocery store food group indexes also rose over the past year, with increases
ranging from 7.8 percent (fruits and vegetables) to 11.0 percent (other food at home).

The index for food away from home rose 7.2 percent over the last year. The index for full
service meals rose 8.7 percent over the last 12 months, the largest 12-month increase since the
inception of the index in 1997. The index for limited service meals rose 7.0 percent over the
last year, while the index for food at employee sites and schools fell 30.0 percent, reflecting
widespread free lunch programs.

Energy

The energy index declined 2.7 percent in April after rising 11.0 percent in March. The gasoline
index declined in April, falling 6.1 percent after increasing 18.3 percent the prior month.
(Before seasonal adjustment, gasoline prices fell 1.0 percent in April.) The other major energy
component indexes increased in April; the index for natural gas rose 3.1 percent and the index
for electricity increased 0.7 percent.

The energy index rose 30.3 percent over the past 12 months. All the major energy component
indexes increased over the year. The gasoline index increased 43.6 percent and the fuel oil
index rose 80.5 percent. The index for electricity rose 11.0 percent, and the index for natural
gas increased 22.7 percent over the last 12 months.

All items less food and energy

The index for all items less food and energy rose 0.6 percent in April. The shelter index
increased 0.5 percent in April, the same increase as in March. The rent index rose 0.6 percent
and the owners' equivalent rent index rose 0.5 percent. The index for lodging away from home
continued to increase, rising 1.7 percent in April after advancing 3.3 percent in March.

The index for airline fares continued to rise sharply, increasing 18.6 percent in April, the
largest 1-month increase since the inception of the series in 1963. The index for new vehicles
increased 1.1 percent in April after rising 0.2 percent in March. The medical care index
increased 0.4 percent in April. The index for hospital services rose 0.5 percent over the month,
the index for physicians' services rose 0.2 percent, and the index for prescription drugs was
unchanged.

The recreation index rose 0.4 percent in April after increasing 0.2 percent in March. The index
for household furnishings and operations continued to increase, rising 0.4 percent in April
after increasing 1.0 percent the prior month. The index for motor vehicle insurance increased
0.8 percent in April. Also rising over the month were the indexes for personal care (+0.4 percent),
education (+0.2 percent), alcoholic beverages (+0.4 percent), and tobacco (+0.4 percent).

A few major component indexes declined in April. The apparel index fell 0.8 percent over the
month, ending a string of six consecutive increases. The index for communication fell 0.4
percent in April, its third consecutive monthly decline. The index for used cars and trucks
also fell 0.4 percent over the month, its third straight decline after a long series of increases.

The index for all items less food and energy rose 6.2 percent over the past 12 months. Virtually
all major components have increased over the span. The shelter index rose 5.1 percent over the
last year, and the medical care index increased 3.2 percent. Several transportation indexes show
notable increases including used cars and trucks (+22.7 percent) and new vehicles (+13.2 percent).
The index for airline fares rose 33.3 percent over the last year, the largest 12-month increase
since the period ending December 1980.

Not seasonally adjusted CPI measures

The Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers (CPI-U) increased 8.3 percent over the last 12
months to an index level of 289.109 (1982-84=100). For the month, the index increased 0.6 percent
prior to seasonal adjustment.

The Consumer Price Index for Urban Wage Earners and Clerical Workers (CPI-W) increased 8.9
percent over the last 12 months to an index level of 284.575 (1982-84=100). For the month, the
index rose 0.5 percent prior to seasonal adjustment.

The Chained Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers (C-CPI-U) increased 7.8 percent over
the last 12 months. For the month, the index increased 0.6 percent on a not seasonally adjusted
basis. Please note that the indexes for the past 10 to 12 months are subject to revision.
_______________
The Consumer Price Index for May 2022 is scheduled to be released on Friday, June 10, 2022 at
8:30 a.m. (ET).



Comments - Make a comment
The comments are owned by the poster. We are not responsible for its content. We value free speech but remember this is a public forum and we hope that people would use common sense and decency. If you see an offensive comment please email us at news@thepinetree.net
No Subject
Posted on: 2022-05-11 08:43:31   By: Anonymous
 
Joe who's fault is it TODAY?

[Reply ]

    Re:
    Posted on: 2022-05-11 11:09:48   By: Anonymous
     
    Rural areas are always the last to come back. The jobs are simply not here, the housing market is very much secondary and everything has to be trucked in. The numbers for the country are very, very good. And if you must assign blame, blame the pandemic (and perhaps those who would not acknowledge it in its infancy). COVID causing supply chain issues, shutting down businesses AND the fact that China is no longer buying American goods (that purchasing power pretty much shutdown as a whole).

    [Reply ]

No Subject
Posted on: 2022-05-11 08:50:32   By: Anonymous
 
I miss that Orange Turd...

[Reply ]

    Re:
    Posted on: 2022-05-11 10:14:31   By: Anonymous
     
    Let’s be perfectly clear here: Biden needs to resign! Every excuse is about the pandemic!!

    [Reply ]

No Subject
Posted on: 2022-05-11 09:02:56   By: Anonymous
 
U.S. inflation

May 2022: 8.3%
January 2021: 1.4%
VOTE RED

[Reply ]

    Re:
    Posted on: 2022-05-11 09:05:17   By: Anonymous
     
    Joe's unfit for the job!

    [Reply ]

No Subject
Posted on: 2022-05-11 09:03:14   By: Anonymous
 
Joe should make another speech and tell us that America is doing great, that is if he can remember what to say.


[Reply ]

    Re:
    Posted on: 2022-05-11 09:31:34   By: Anonymous
     
    Bumbling Biden blames the Republicans for the reason why he sh*ts every hour in his Depends.

    [Reply ]

    Re:
    Posted on: 2022-05-11 09:32:06   By: Anonymous
     
    As your President America is doing great because of me. Hahahahaha

    [Reply ]

      Re:
      Posted on: 2022-05-11 09:45:23   By: Anonymous
       
      I'd like to take Joe behind the gym.

      [Reply ]

No Subject
Posted on: 2022-05-11 11:10:32   By: Anonymous
 
Plenty of good, well-paying jobs throughout the nation IF you have the education and training.

[Reply ]

    Re:
    Posted on: 2022-05-11 11:20:27   By: Anonymous
     
    ^ I've got 20 bucks you're a democrat ^

    [Reply ]

No Subject
Posted on: 2022-05-11 11:17:51   By: Anonymous
 
The war in Ukraine is driving up gas prices to a point. The greater issue is that you're still buying and there's no incentive for oil companies to reduce their prices. For the record, there have been many, many approved drilling permits throughout the west and southwest in recent years. Petroleum companies (primarily held by GOP owners and stockholders) are reluctant to reinvest when profits are high and they are unable to hire enough competent workers. Big oil has invested before, only to not be able to explain their actions (and dwindling profit margin) to shareholders.

[Reply ]

    Re:
    Posted on: 2022-05-11 11:22:37   By: Anonymous
     
    I love democrats they keep cutting there own throats...

    [Reply ]

      Re:
      Posted on: 2022-05-11 21:26:55   By: Anonymous
       
      I love Republicans. They keep inhaling Trump and the big lie.

      [Reply ]

        Re: Plugs to the rescue!
        Posted on: 2022-05-12 16:48:59   By: Anonymous
         
        Our country is in the toilet but Brandon and his Build-Back-Better plan is doing great!!!

        [Reply ]


What's Related
These might interest you as well
Local News

Calendar

Photo Albums

phpws Business Directory


Mark Twain Medical Center
Meadowmont Pharmacy
Bank of Stockton
Bear Valley Real Estate
Bear Valley Cross Country
Cave, Mine & Zip Lines
Fox Security
Bistro Espresso
Pinnacle Physical Therapy
Chatom Winery
Middleton's Furniture
Bear Valley Mountain Resort
Paul D. Bertini
Premier Properties
High Country Spa & Stove
Calaveras Mentoriing

Ebbetts Pass Scenic Byway
Sierra Logging Museum
Jenny's Kitchen

Copyright © The Pine Tree 2005-2022