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Posted by: thepinetree on 08/11/2021 07:14 PM Updated by: thepinetree on 08/11/2021 10:20 PM
Expires: 01/01/2026 12:00 AM
:

Consumer Prices Soar in June! Energy up 23.8%, Used Vehicles up 41.7% & All Items up 5.4%

Washington, DC...The Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers (CPI-U) increased 0.5 percent in July on a seasonally adjusted basis after rising 0.9 percent in June, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. Over the last 12 months, the all items index increased 5.4 percent before seasonal adjustment.




The indexes for shelter, food, energy, and new vehicles all increased in July and contributed to the monthly all items seasonally adjusted increase. The food index increased 0.7 percent in July as five of the major grocery store food group indexes rose, and the food away from home index increased 0.8 percent. The energy index rose 1.6 percent in July, as the gasoline index increased 2.4 percent and other energy component indexes also rose.

The index for all items less food and energy rose 0.3 percent in July after increasing 0.9 percent in June. Along with shelter and new vehicles, the indexes for recreation, for medical care, and for personal care increased in July. The index for used cars also increased in July, but the 0.2-percent advance was much smaller than in recent months. The index for motor vehicle insurance declined in July, and the index for airline fares fell slightly.

The all items index rose 5.4 percent for the 12 months ending July, the same increase as the period ending June. The index for all items less food and energy rose 4.3 percent over the last 12 months, while the energy index rose 23.8 percent. The food index increased 3.4 percent for the 12 months ending July, compared to a 2.4-percent rise for the period ending June.
Table A. Percent changes in CPI for All Urban Consumers (CPI-U): U.S. city
average

Seasonally adjusted changes from
preceding month
Un-
adjusted
12-mos.
Jan. Feb. Mar. Apr. May June July ended
2021 2021 2021 2021 2021 2021 2021 July
2021

All items.................. .3 .4 .6 .8 .6 .9 .5 5.4
Food...................... .1 .2 .1 .4 .4 .8 .7 3.4
Food at home............. -.1 .3 .1 .4 .4 .8 .7 2.6
Food away from home (1).. .3 .1 .1 .3 .6 .7 .8 4.6
Energy.................... 3.5 3.9 5.0 -.1 .0 1.5 1.6 23.8
Energy commodities....... 7.3 6.6 8.9 -1.4 -.6 2.6 2.3 41.2
Gasoline (all types).... 7.4 6.4 9.1 -1.4 -.7 2.5 2.4 41.8
Fuel oil (1)............ 5.4 9.9 3.2 -3.2 2.1 2.9 .6 39.1
Energy services.......... -.3 .9 .6 1.5 .7 .2 .8 7.2
Electricity............. -.2 .7 .0 1.2 .3 -.3 .4 4.0
Utility (piped) gas
service.............. -.4 1.6 2.5 2.4 1.7 1.7 2.2 19.0
All items less food and
energy................. .0 .1 .3 .9 .7 .9 .3 4.3
Commodities less food and
energy commodities.... .1 -.2 .1 2.0 1.8 2.2 .5 8.5
New vehicles............ -.5 .0 .0 .5 1.6 2.0 1.7 6.4
Used cars and trucks.... -.9 -.9 .5 10.0 7.3 10.5 .2 41.7
Apparel................. 2.2 -.7 -.3 .3 1.2 .7 .0 4.2
Medical care
commodities (1)...... -.1 -.7 .1 .6 .0 -.4 .2 -2.1
Services less energy
services.............. .0 .2 .4 .5 .4 .4 .3 2.9
Shelter................. .1 .2 .3 .4 .3 .5 .4 2.8
Transportation services -.3 -.1 1.8 2.9 1.5 1.5 -1.1 6.4
Medical care services... .5 .5 .1 .0 -.1 .0 .3 .8

1 Not seasonally adjusted.
Food

The food index increased 0.7 percent in July after rising 0.8 percent in June.
The index for food at home also rose 0.7 percent, as the index for meats, poultry,
fish, and eggs continued to increase. This index rose 1.5 percent in July; this
was its seventh monthly increase in a row and followed a 2.5-percent increase in
June. The index for cereals and bakery products, which declined in June, rose 1.2
percent in July, its largest 1-month increase since April 2020. The index for
other food at home rose 0.8 percent in July, also the largest monthly increase
since April 2020. The index for nonalcoholic beverages rose 0.7 percent in July,
and the index for dairy and related products advanced 0.6 percent.

The index for fruits and vegetables was the only major grocery store food group
index to fall in July, declining 0.9 percent after rising 0.7 percent in June.
The index for fresh fruits fell 1.8 percent over the month.

The food away from home index rose 0.8 percent in July, its largest monthly
increase since February 1981. The index for limited service meals rose 1.0 percent
in July, and the index for full service meals increased 0.6 percent.

The food at home index increased 2.6 percent over the past 12 months. All six
major grocery store food group indexes rose over the span, with increases ranging
from 1.1 percent (nonalcoholic beverages) to 5.9 percent (meats, poultry, fish,
and eggs). The index for food away from home rose 4.6 percent over the last year.
The index for limited service meals rose 6.6 percent over the last 12 months, and
the index for full service meals rose 4.3 percent. Both 12-month increases were
the largest in the history of the respective series, which were first published
in 1998.

Energy

The energy index increased 1.6 percent in July after rising 1.5 percent in June.
All the major energy component indexes increased over the month. The gasoline
index rose 2.4 percent in July following a 2.5-percent increase in June. (Before
seasonal adjustment, gasoline prices rose 2.5 percent in July.) The index for
natural gas rose 2.2 percent in July after increasing 1.7 percent in both May and
June. The electricity index increased 0.4 percent in July after falling 0.3
percent the prior month.

The energy index rose 23.8 percent over the past 12 months. The gasoline index
rose 41.8 percent since July 2020. The index for natural gas rose 19.0 percent
over the last 12 months, while the index for electricity increased 4.0 percent.

All items less food and energy

The index for all items less food and energy rose 0.3 percent in July, its
smallest monthly increase in 4 months. The shelter index rose 0.4 percent in July
and accounted for over half of the monthly increase in the index for all items
less food and energy. The index for rent rose 0.2 percent and the index for
owners’ equivalent rent increased 0.3 percent. The index for lodging away from
home continued to rise sharply, increasing 6.0 percent in July after rising 7.0
percent in June.

The index for new vehicles rose 1.7 percent in July and has now increased 5.4
percent over the last 3 months. The recreation index rose 0.6 percent in July
after increasing 0.2 percent in June. The index for medical care rose 0.3 percent
in July after declining in May and June. The index for physicians’ services rose
0.4 percent and the index for hospital services advanced 0.5 percent, while the
index for prescription drugs declined 0.1 percent. The index for personal care
increased 0.8 percent in July.

The index for used cars and trucks rose 0.2 percent in July after rising at least
7.3 percent in each of the last 3 months. The deceleration in the index was a
major factor in the smaller monthly increase in the index for all items less food
and energy. The indexes for education, for communication, for tobacco, and for
alcoholic beverages all increased in July, while the indexes for household
furnishings and operations and for apparel were unchanged.

The index for motor vehicle insurance was one of the few major component indexes
to decline in July, falling 2.8 percent after rising in each of the last 6 months.
The index for airline fares fell slightly in July, declining 0.1 percent after
rising sharply in recent months.

The index for all items less food and energy rose 4.3 percent over the past 12
months. The index for used cars and trucks increased 41.7 percent over the span.
The index for new vehicles rose 6.4 percent, the largest 12-month increase since
the period ending January 1982. The shelter index increased 2.8 percent over the
last 12 months, and the medical care index rose only 0.3 percent. Few major
component indexes declined over the past 12 months.

Not seasonally adjusted CPI measures

The Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers (CPI-U) increased 5.4 percent
over the last 12 months to an index level of 273.003 (1982-84=100). For the month,
the index increased 0.5 percent prior to seasonal adjustment.

The Consumer Price Index for Urban Wage Earners and Clerical Workers (CPI-W)
increased 6.0 percent over the last 12 months to an index level of 267.789
(1982-84=100). For the month, the index rose 0.5 percent prior to seasonal
adjustment.

The Chained Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers (C-CPI-U) increased 5.3
percent over the last 12 months. For the month, the index increased 0.5 percent
on a not seasonally adjusted basis. Please note that the indexes for the past 10
to 12 months are subject to revision.
_______________
The Consumer Price Index for August 2021 is scheduled to be released on Tuesday,
September 14, 2021 at 8:30 a.m. (ET).

 


Comments - Make a comment
The comments are owned by the poster. We are not responsible for its content. We value free speech but remember this is a public forum and we hope that people would use common sense and decency. If you see an offensive comment please email us at news@thepinetree.net
No Subject
Posted on: 2021-08-11 19:29:09   By: Anonymous
 
I hope that all of you Demorats are happy that you voted in a demented piece of sh*t for our President. Just look at the increases in all of these consumer goods. Sloppy Joe is a fuking Idiot and a damn liar. He is the reason that Covid cases are increasing by opening the borders and letting these scum bag illegal aliens cross our borders without testing for Covid and letting them infiltrate throughout the United States. I just hope that the United States does not enter a war with Russia, China, or North Korea. God help us all if that ever happens as we have the most frail and weakest President ever.

[Reply ]

    Re:
    Posted on: 2021-08-11 19:46:00   By: Anonymous
     
    I don’t know if you’ve heard, but there’s a global pandemic going on that’s interfering with supply chains around the world.

    [Reply ]

      Re:
      Posted on: 2021-08-11 20:45:10   By: Anonymous
       
      I don't if you have heard but that is Fingers Joe's problem and he needs to FIX IT NOW and stop being a pussy!

      [Reply ]

        Re:
        Posted on: 2021-08-11 21:42:39   By: Anonymous
         
        Lol, you dopes get what you get, when you voted for the Democratic Party! Well done!

        [Reply ]

        Re:
        Posted on: 2021-08-12 00:41:47   By: Anonymous
         
        He isn’t president of the WORLD 😂😂😂

        [Reply ]

        Re:
        Posted on: 2021-08-12 08:39:17   By: Anonymous
         
        Economics doesn't work that way. It's a long process coming back from an economic shutdown. Not unlike blaming Obama when Bush drove the economy into the ground and spent the greatest surplus in our history. Oh, wait... you did.

        [Reply ]

          Re:
          Posted on: 2021-08-12 08:40:15   By: Anonymous
           
          Its all Trumps fault

          [Reply ]

      Re: Hi, I'm Joe and I use to be a big rig driver
      Posted on: 2021-08-12 08:22:42   By: Anonymous
       
      Incase you haven't heard the senile imbecile halted new oil and natural gas leases on public lands and waters, and since he did that fuel prices rose 28 percent to where we now pay $4.49 a gallon for unleaded and diesel. Shutting down the keystone pipeline also put 10,000 plus people out of work.
      You would think with Joe telling those workers at the Mack truck facility in Pennsylvania that he use to drive an 18 Wheeler that he should of known that would raise fuel prices. When fuel cost more, goods being shipped will also rise. I guess I thought a trucker was smart enough to add two plus two but seems he's a little too dumb for that.

      [Reply ]

        Re: Hi, I'm Joe and I use to be a big rig driver
        Posted on: 2021-08-12 08:41:31   By: Anonymous
         
        A lot more people will be going to work under the president's just passed infrastructure plan. And I don't know about you, but I'd like to work at keeping the planet around a bit longer for my grandchildren. Any reasonable plan to at least stall the effects of climate change must include less dependance if not elimination of fossil fuel and putting a damper on Republic greed.

        [Reply ]

        Re: Hi, I'm Joe and I use to be a big rig driver
        Posted on: 2021-08-12 08:43:27   By: Anonymous
         
        Simple supply and demand. A lot of pent up demand from Americans who could not travel, are doing so again and willing to pay the price at the pump and in the air.

        [Reply ]

    Re:
    Posted on: 2021-08-12 08:37:48   By: Anonymous
     
    Nothing to do with Biden but a normal part of a recovery from the pandemic. Inflation fueled by a global supply shortage from the shutdown and the pent up demand from consumers (yes, companies will charge more if there is a shortage and they know the consumer will pay.). So, despite the current pinch to home budgets it's actually a good thing and shows we are rebounding. It's also likely that interest rates will go up in a fed attempt to moderate inflation.

    [Reply ]

      Re:
      Posted on: 2021-08-12 09:26:12   By: Anonymous
       
      Stop your making too much sense , this is the pine tree.

      I’m fine with higher gas prices, we need to reduce our use of fossil fuels. ICE and gasoline will be a relic of the 20th century soon.

      Being on renewables,
      LI-PO battery’s with solar arrays,
      and 700 HP electric vehicles

      [Reply ]

        Re:
        Posted on: 2021-08-12 11:05:12   By: Anonymous
         
        Listen to ALL OF THE EXCUSES the snowflakes are making. Make America last is his war cry. Supply chains have been an issue since day 1 of the pandemic and prices didn’t go up until the puppet took office. Why do we have supply chain issues? It’s due to us having almost everything manufactured outside the US. Why is everything manufactured outside the US? TAXES!
        We’re China’s little bitch. They could put sanctions in place that would decimate us.

        [Reply ]

No Subject
Posted on: 2021-08-12 08:38:00   By: Anonymous
 
Do you miss me yet?

[Reply ]

    Re:
    Posted on: 2021-08-12 08:41:09   By: Anonymous
     
    As much as I miss Trump.

    [Reply ]

      Re:
      Posted on: 2021-08-12 11:05:48   By: Anonymous
       
      Nothing to do with Biden , Ha Ha , suck on that Demorat protein straw some more

      [Reply ]


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