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Posted by: thepinetree on 02/19/2017 10:28 AM Updated by: thepinetree on 02/19/2017 10:28 AM
Expires: 01/01/2022 12:00 AM
:

On Continuing The Attack In Life's Battles

"In every battle there comes a time when both sides consider themselves beaten, then he who continues the attack wins." – Ulysses S. Grant


18th President of the United States





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No Subject
Posted on: 2017-02-19 11:10:27   By: Anonymous
 
That's why Trump gets it!

[Reply ]

    Re:
    Posted on: 2017-02-19 11:16:45   By: Anonymous
     
    Exactly! Finally, American people are put first along with America now that we have a truthful, brilliant, patriotic American as our President! Thank you President Trump!

    [Reply ]

      Re:
      Posted on: 2017-02-19 11:33:50   By: Anonymous
       
      A self proclaimed Patriot, John McCain is a true Patriot, up to and including being shot down and tortured by the enemy. A true war hero and Patriot. Trump didn't serve and neither did Obama, time will tell with Trump, but his ego not only annoys me,it scares me.

      [Reply ]

        Re:
        Posted on: 2017-02-19 12:04:35   By: Anonymous
         
        Did the person above say truthful. He is not truthful.

        [Reply ]

          GRANT WAS A PILLAGER
          Posted on: 2017-02-19 19:09:46   By: Anonymous
           
          By condoning Sjerman's actions, Grant himself was a rapist and pillager. He allowed his men to kill civilians and burn homes. They released livestock and stole from families as they marched to Savannah in Georgia. He's no hero. But the winners write the history books...

          Major General William Tecumseh Sherman was a contradiction embodied. He eliminated Atlanta's war making potential and brought sheer destruction to Georgia, then offered generous surrender terms. His vision of hard war brought the Confederacy to its knees, but forestalled thousands of battlefield and civilian deaths.
          Magazine Spread

          One word still resonates more deeply in the American psyche than any other in the field of Civil War study: Sherman. The name immediately conjures visions of fire and smoke, destruction and desolation; Atlanta in flames, farms laid to waste and railroad tracks mangled beyond recognition. In our collective memory, blue-clad soldiers march with impunity, their scavenged booty draped about them, leaving a trail of white women and children to sob at their losses and slaves to rejoice at their emancipation. Sherman himself is remembered through a nearly ubiquitous photograph, with a glare so icy it can chill us even across time. To average Americans, whether they are Northerners or Southerners, Sherman was a hard, cruel soldier, an unfeeling destroyer, the man who rampaged rather than fought, a brute rather than a human being.

          The full story, however, is not this simple. Certainly, Sherman practiced destructive war, but he did not do it out of personal cruelty. Instead, he sought to end the war as quickly as possible, with the least loss of life on both sides.
          In this issue

          Hallowed Ground Fall 2014 Cover

          Shenandoah Campaign: Again into the Valley of Fire
          Sherman's March to the Sea: Scorched Earth
          Petersburg Campaign: “A little more butchery. A little more slaughter.”
          Profiles in Preservation: Jim Vaughan
          The Election of 1864

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          Become a member and receive Hallowed Ground magazine »

          The March to the Sea was no off-the-cuff reaction by Sherman to finding himself in Atlanta in September 1864 and knowing he could not remain there. He had for a long time hated the idea of having to kill and maim Confederates, many of whom had been pre-war friends. He wanted his army to win the war and thus preserve the Union, but he also wanted to curtail the battlefield slaughter. He sought to utilize destructive war to convince Confederate citizens in their deepest psyche both that they could not win the war and that their government could not protect them from Federal forces. He wanted to convey that southerners controlled their own fate through a duality of approach: as long as they remained in rebellion, they would suffer at his hands, once they surrendered, he would display remarkable largess.

          And so, in Atlanta, Sherman instituted tactics later generations of American war leaders would use in World War II, Korea, Vietnam, Iraq and Afghanistan. In these later conflicts, largely through the use of air power, Americans attempted to destroy enemy will and logistics (a doctrine colloquially known as “shock and awe” in Operation Iraqi Freedom). On the ground and on a much smaller scale, Sherman pioneered this process, becoming the first American to do so systematically. He is rightly called the American father of total warfare, a harbinger of the psychological tactics of the next century.
          Cotton
          On his march, Sherman destroyed thousands of acres of Georgia cotton fields like this along with numerous cotton gins and mills. (Mike Raker)

          Just what was this warfare revolution? Two months after capturing Atlanta, Sherman was ready to move out and decided to strip the city of its military infrastructure. In preparation, he moved the few people remaining in the city — about 10 percent of its 20,000-person population in early 1864 — out of the area, and cut his supply line. This freed all his troops for the upcoming movement, rather than relegating a significant number for logistical duty, but this meant that the men would need to “live off the land.” From Atlanta, Sherman would set out across the Southern heartland toward the Atlantic Ocean, eventually turning north to pin Robert E. Lee’s army between his troops and those of Grant.

          But the way to the sea was not open; Sherman still had to contend with the Confederate army of Lt. Gen. John Bell Hood. So Sherman proposed to split his Union force, taking 62,000 of his best troops on a destructive march, while Maj. Gen. George H. Thomas used the remainder to contain Hood. Lincoln and Ulysses S. Grant preferred for Sherman to destroy the Southern army first and then initiate his psychological war of destruction. But Sherman prevailed upon his commanding officer, who, in turn, convinced the president. Grant himself said that he would not have allowed anyone other than Sherman to attempt such a march — so great was the respect and trust between the two.

          Sherman wasted no time. On November 15, 62,000 men — split into two infantry wings (actually four parallel corps columns) with screening cavalry to protect the main bodies as they spread across the landscape — departed Atlanta. The city was hardly burned to the ground, as Gone with the Wind implies. Not all of the destruction was even Sherman’s doing: some one-third of the city’s buildings were in ruins as a result of entrenchments dug by the Confederates and the detonation of ammunition performed as part of Hood’s evacuation. Although Sherman’s army had systematically destroyed Atlanta’s war-making potential, and had used artillery to bombard the city before taking it, 400 houses were still standing when he left.

          Sherman's March to the Sea Map

          Sherman wanted to keep his movements as secret as possible; he cut telegraph lines to prevent intelligence reports from reaching the enemy (or his superiors in Washington). Although Sherman told his officers and troops little about his plans, they quickly grasped the basic purpose of the march and, trusting their commander fully, were unconcerned about the lack of details. “Uncle Billy, I guess Grant is waiting for us in Richmond?” was a common sentiment along the march.

          Georgia, stretching before Sherman’s army with its red clay hills and sandy terrain, was the largest of the Confederate states. It had some large plantations, but many more small farms growing a variety of products: vegetables, cotton, sweet potatoes and, in marshy areas, rice and sugar cane. Well known to Sherman from his study of the 1860 census, Georgia’s fertile soil still held potential to feed the ravenous Confederacy. Although beef cattle trudged along with his army, and he had his men fill their haversacks with food before they left, he knew that they could live off the Georgia land.

          Those Confederate troops blocking Sherman’s way were few and weak. Lt. Gen. William J. Hardee commanded the undermanned Department of South Carolina, Georgia and Florida, and Maj. Gen. Gustavus W. Smith led the small Georgia state militia. The most potent Confederate force in the state was Joseph Wheeler’s 3,500-man cavalry, which managed to harass Sherman’s marchers but was too small to pose a deadly threat.
          Shermans Men
          Men on a mission (L to R): Union Maj. Gens. Sherman, O.O. Howard and Henry Slocum and cavalry commander Brig. Gen. Judson Kilpatrick sought to hasten the war’s end without shedding more blood by crippling the Southern heartland. They left a trail of char and rubble, but few corpses, in their wake. (Photos Library of Congress, Colorized by MADS MADSEN of Colorized History)

          From the outset, Sherman’s men destroyed tunnels and bridges, expending particular effort to make railroad tracks unusable. The approach was backbreaking, but simple: rails were torn from the ties, which were stacked to make a bonfire beneath them. Once the rails became red hot, they were twisted into what came to be known as “Sherman’s neckties” or “Sherman’s hairpins.” The campaign’s chief engineer, Col. Orlando Poe, even devised specialized equipment, called cant hooks, for the task.

          Sherman’s soldiers enthusiastically embraced his Special Field Order 120, which required every brigade to organize a foraging detachment under the direction of one of its more “discreet” officers with a goal of keeping a consistent three-day supply of gathered foodstuffs. Once, Sherman encountered a soldier walking along a road weighed down by all victuals who quoted from the order to him in a stage whisper: “Forage liberally on the country.” The general said his was a too-liberal interpretation of the order, but he took no action to punish the forager. Clearly this soldier was practicing the psychological destructive warfare against Georgia that his commander wanted.

          Not only was Sherman’s army vastly larger and superior to the Confederate military, but he also outmaneuvered the few Confederate forces and kept them uncertain about his destination. He fooled the Confederates into believing that one part of his army was heading toward Augusta, while the other wing was heading for Macon. In fact, his true destination was the Georgia capital of Milledgeville. Wheeler’s 3,500 man Confederate cavalry tried to hinder Sherman’s army, but Brig. Gen. Judson Kilpatrick’s 5,000 Union horse soldiers cleared it out of the way. Confederate political and military leaders — Gov. Joe Brown, Hardee and militia commander Smith among them — all fell for the ruse.

          The only real combat of the March took place on November 22, near Griswoldville. The militia, temporarily under the inexperienced command of Brig. Gen. Pleasant J. Phillips, came upon part of Sherman’s rear guard of some 1,700 men. Not realizing that these Federals had repeating rifles and were dug in, temporary commander Phillips ordered his motley force to attack, and they were ripped to pieces by the Federals. After the shooting had stopped, the Union troops discovered, to their horror, that their attackers had been old men and young boys and wondered at the futility of the Confederate cause.
          Griswoldville
          Griswoldville Battlefield State Historical Site, Ga. (Photo: Evan Leavitt)

          No matter — Sherman kept marching. To Confederate bewilderment, he bypassed Augusta and entered Confederate politician and brigadier general Howell Cobb’s plantation some 10 miles outside Milledgeville, his true destination. The capital city panicked. The state legislature extended the existing state draft to include men from 16 to 65 years of age. Those prisoners in the state jail willing to take up arms for the Confederacy — 175 out of 200 — were freed, although some of the newly liberated men burned down the penitentiary rather than report for duty. Politicians hurried to escape the city, and its civilian inhabitants were infuriated when Sherman’s men celebrated Thanksgiving there and mockingly re-enacted a legislative session to vote Georgia back into the Union. More seriously, the soldiers damaged state buildings and destroyed books and manuscripts before leaving Milledgeville on November 24. Sherman’s army had now been marching for a week.

          The army moved at a steady pace, covering as much as 15 miles a day. Reveille came at daybreak and sometimes earlier. The 62,000-man army usually spent the night in tents, the campsites stretching in all directions. After a sparse breakfast, they formed the columns and began moving. Railroad tracks were upended and destroyed. Black and white pioneers cleared the path ahead, with Sherman himself sometimes joining in the physical labor. There was no lunch stop; instead, the men ate whenever and whatever they could. When they reached the assigned campsite in the evening, each man hooked his tent half to another’s, pitched it, and then prepared the only full meal of the day over a fire. The soldiers entertained themselves by letter writing, card games and other such diversions, but the favorite activity was to hear the adventures of the foragers.

          As the main columns had been marching all day, organized soldiers and others fanned out in all directions, looking for food and booty. Very quickly, these foragers came to be called “bummers,” and it was they who did the most damage to the countryside and provided the most food for the troops. They wandered out five or more miles from the main columns and became experts at finding hidden food, horses, wagons and even slaves. Operating under varying degrees of supervision, their exploits formed the foundation of Sherman’s lasting reputation.

          Whether it was a plantation manor, a more modest white dwelling or a slave hut, any residence encountered by these bummers stood a chance of being utterly ransacked. Barns, gardens and farms were overrun. Although many of the houses were damaged — and a minority put to the torch and totally destroyed — others were left essentially untouched, an unpredictability that became a source of great fear. “No doubt many acts of pillage, robbery, and violence were committed by these parties of foragers …,” Sherman acknowledged, but maintained that their crimes were generally against property, not individuals. “I never heard of any cases of murder or rape.” Indeed relatively few charges of rape were made, and military medical records showed little sexual disease. Still, sexual violence, especially in wartime, remains an underreported crime up to the present.
          Sherman's Necktie
          How to tie a "Sherman Necktie": #1 Build a bonfire #2 Heat a railway rail until it is malleable #3 When red hot, bend and twist around a tree like a bow tie. (Library of Congress)

          When Joe Wheeler’s horsemen also began destroying property and looting, the psychological shock of Confederates abusing their own people was hard for the Georgia civilians to take. Perhaps in denial of this reality, they came to accuse Sherman of carrying out countless grim acts. He seemed to be everywhere at once, and as he grew ever-larger in the Southern imagination, rumors about where he was and what he did to white women and slaves came to be accepted as fact. Since spreading terror farther afield only intensified the impact of his March to the Sea, all of this suited Sherman’s purposes perfectly.

          The arrival of the main columns was even more frightening to the Georgians in their path than the passage of the foragers. As one Georgia woman wrote in her diary: “…like Demons they rush in! … To my smoke house, my Dairy, Pantry, kitchen & cellar.” It was difficult to hide anything from the foragers or the massive main column. Soldiers dug up buried food, valuables and keepsakes, seemingly at will. They searched hollow logs and any hiding place imaginable. Sometimes the slaves would volunteer information, and other times the foragers would force it out of them.

          As the marching Federals progressed, they attracted a growing throng of ex-slaves, who greeted them as emancipators. Although he personally considered them inferior to white men, Sherman treated the blacks he met with courtesies not widespread in the 19th century, shaking hands and carrying on conversations to glean their knowledge of the area. While many blacks became laborers and performed tasks necessary to the advance, others simply followed in the wake of the column. This caused Sherman, who was trying to move quickly and live off the land, to worry about their impact on his speed and the supply of food meant for his soldiers. And even in this Union army of liberation, the racism of the age was still prevalent throughout the ranks. The former slaves grew increasingly hesitant about getting too close to the white soldiers, who might be their source of freedom, but who often treated them with harshness and disrespect. Yet, whenever they had a choice, they preferred the Federals to Confederate soldiers and civilians who had no compunction about killing them or returning them to slavery.
          St. Stephen's Episcopal Church Milledgeville, Ga.
          St. Stephen's Episcopal Church Milledgeville, Ga. In November 1864, soldiers from the 107th New York Infantry Regiment took shelter in St. Stephen’s, as well as other churches on the square. They burned pews and poured syrup into the pipes of St. Stephen’s organ. When the nearby magazine and arsenal were blown up as the troops left, the roof was damaged and the windows were blown out. (Photo: Evan Leavitt)

          It was just such a conflict of interest that caused one of the most horrific events of the campaign. Acting as the rear guard for the army, on December 9, 1864, Federals under the command of Maj. Gen. Jefferson C. Davis were crossing the flooded Ebenezer Creek on a pontoon bridge. The long line of fugitive slaves, some 650 of them, was ordered to await a signal before crossing. But as the last unit of Davis’s rear guard, the 58th Indiana, reached the far side, the bridge was unlashed. The pontoons floated away, leaving the slaves unable to cross the deep water.

          Knowing that Confederate cavalry was nearby, the fugitives, fearful of being captured and killed or re-enslaved, panicked. They jumped into the water, frantically trying to swim across and evade Wheeler. Seeing their terror and desperation, some Federals began throwing logs and anything else they could find toward the drowning people. Although some were saved on makeshift rafts or by soldiers who waded into the creek, a huge number drowned and others were captured by the arriving Confederate troopers. Davis, who was no stranger to scandal — he was arrested for murdering fellow Union general William Nelson in August 1862, but escaped court martial — took a great deal of blame for this horror, but Sherman defended him. He blamed the ex-slave refugees for ignoring his advice not to follow the army.

          Two weeks after this incident, and 20 miles removed, the march ended in Savannah. Sherman’s army reached the sea, took Fort McAllister and re-tied itself to a naval supply line. On December 21, Union forces captured Savannah; Sherman presented the city to Lincoln as a Christmas gift.

          Almost miraculously, damage and destruction immediately ceased. Sherman allowed Hardee’s army to escape the city, although he could have crushed it. Soldiers became model gentlemen, no longer foraging, but paying for what they wanted or needed. Sherman had his favorite regimental band present a concert for the city and brought supply ships from the North to help the city and its people regain a sense of normality. The general himself was a model of deportment. In escaping Savannah, several Confederate generals left their wives and children to Sherman’s personal protection, and he took this responsibility seriously, despite laughing that Confederates were willing to leave their families in the care of someone they considered a brute.

          It was a strange end to a destructive month, but perhaps it should not have been unexpected. When Sherman instituted his destructive war, he told Southerners that as long as they continued their resistance, he would make them pay dearly, but that the process would stop when they quit the fight. As soon as the mayor of Savannah surrendered his city, Sherman the fiend became Sherman the friend.
          Fort McAllister State Park Savannah, Ga.
          Fort McAllister State Park Savannah, Ga. (David Davis)

          When it came time to march through the Carolinas, states still in rebellion against the United States, however, destructive war returned. In fact, South Carolina suffered more at Sherman’s hands than Georgia had during the March to the Sea. Sherman demanded surrender, and he would accept nothing less, so his men tore through the Palmetto State. North Carolina suffered less because it was not viewed as responsible for the rebellion, as South Carolina was. When Gen. Joseph E. Johnston surrendered at Durham Station, N.C., in April 1865, Sherman offered a peace plan lenient enough that it caused many in the North to question his loyalty. In reality it was a final iteration of his campaign to show mercy immediately upon surrender.

          In short, the March to the Sea demonstrates not that Sherman was a brute, but that he wanted to wage a war that did not result in countless deaths. He saw destruction of property as less onerous than casualties. It is estimated that during the six-week March to the Sea fewer than 3,000 casualties resulted. Compared to the 51,000 killed, wounded and missing at Gettysburg in the three days of fighting there or the 24,000 in the two days at Shiloh, the month-long March to the Sea was nearly bloodless.

          Yet, the March is remembered to this day as barbarism unleashed. There was glory to die in Pickett’s Charge at Gettysburg, but only humiliation to have one’s barn burned, silverware taken, house damaged or destroyed, or horses added to the enemy cavalry. Sherman successfully fought a psychological war of destruction. He entered the Confederate psyche and remains in some minds to the present day.
          About the Author

          John F. Marszalek is the executive editor and managing editor of the Ulysses S. Grant Presidential Library at Mississippi State University.

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          [Reply ]

            Re: GRANT WAS A PILLAGER
            Posted on: 2017-02-19 20:42:42   By: Anonymous
             
            WHAT EVER

            [Reply ]

            Re: GRANT WAS A PILLAGER
            Posted on: 2017-02-20 04:43:24   By: Anonymous
             
            OH LOOK ^ SOMEONE IS WRITING A BOOK. MUST BE ONE OF THOSE CRYSTAL METH GUYS MY GRANDSON TOLD ME ABOUT...SAID THEY DON'T KNOWW WHEN TO SHUT THE BUCK UP NANA THEY DON'T


            NOW MY QUESTION IS, WHY IS THERE A PICTURE OF HILLARY AND WHY DIDN'T SHE SHAVE THAT MORNING?

            SORRY ABOUT THE CAPS MY COMPUTER CRASHED AND I CAN'T SEE DIDDLY OR *bleep* UNTIL MY POT SMOKING WIZ KID GRANDSON COMES HERE AND DOES HIS ANGEL DUST MAGIC OR WHAT EVER HE CALLS IT AND FIXES THIS PILE OF AGGRAVATING PILE OF PLASTIC THAT I CAUGHT MY HUSBAND IF YOU CAN CALL THAT USELESS THING THAT TRYING TO DO SOMETHING WITH HIS LUMP OF DEAD MEAT IN HIS HAND SHAKING IT ALMOST TO DEATH I MARRIED HIM CAUSE IT WAS THE BIGGEST ONE I HAD EVER SEEN BUT I KNOW A DEAD TREE WHEN ITS ON THE GROUND AND THIS THING COULD HAVE THEM BARK BEETLES AND TERMITES IN IT EITHER WAY THE KEY BOARD WASNT STICKY.....BUT IT DID KINDA OF GAVE ME GOOSE PIMPLES WATCHING HIM TRYING TO SHAKE SOME OF THOSE BEETLES OUT

            ANYWAY MY GOOD HILLARY LOOKS LIKE A PILE OF COLD DOG OH *bleep* I FORGOT YOU CAN'T SWEAR HERE SORRY WILL THEY TAKE MY LICENSE AWAY OR SOMETHING? I'M SORRY

            [Reply ]

        Re:
        Posted on: 2017-02-19 12:04:35   By: Anonymous
         
        ^ When you attack Donald J. Trump, you attack us we the people !

        [Reply ]

          Re:
          Posted on: 2017-02-19 12:05:34   By: Anonymous
           
          That is BS

          [Reply ]

        Re:
        Posted on: 2017-02-19 12:37:03   By: Anonymous
         
        McSame is like Boxer and needs to retire like Reid and Pigloski.

        [Reply ]

          Re:
          Posted on: 2017-02-19 13:26:09   By: Anonymous
           
          Amen to that , not sure what's happening to McCain. Maybe he should have run in place of Billary.

          [Reply ]

            The Dump Resistance Will Win
            Posted on: 2017-02-19 13:46:23   By: Anonymous
             
            With Dump at 39% popularity, the vast majority don't want to support a narcissistic tyrant using a fascist play book.

            The resistance is growing quickly, the unpopular Republican plans will be stopped , the people want their Social Security , Medicare, ACA left intact.
            They want to have America keep it's reputation, allies, they don't want another Republican caused depression. They want a future of good health, and well being. This is threatened by a sociopathic narcissistic fascistic end time suicidal maniac.

            The Resistance will win, truth, love wins over hate and fear.


            Mahatma Gandhi- Dr Martin Luther King -
            First they ignore you
            Then they laugh at you
            Then they fight you
            Then you win


            [Reply ]

              Brain Washed !
              Posted on: 2017-02-19 13:55:19   By: Anonymous
               
              Exactly! Finally, American people are put first along with America now that we have a truthful, brilliant, patriotic American as our President! Thank you President Trump!

              This is what brain washing looks like

              [Reply ]

              Re: The Dump Resistance Will Win
              Posted on: 2017-02-19 14:18:55   By: Anonymous
               
              Well actually, "And then they put a bullet in your head" should be the last quip from that quote.

              [Reply ]

            Re:
            Posted on: 2017-02-19 13:58:03   By: Anonymous
             
            I think the truth of the matter is , none of them regardless of party don't want an outsider coming into their sandbox and threatening their gravy train.

            [Reply ]

No Subject
Posted on: 2017-02-19 14:07:36   By: Anonymous
 
President Trump Thank You for fighting for us and if you would, all those Sore Losers/Cry Babies in Calaveras County.

[Reply ]

The Majority Will Not Be Silenced
Posted on: 2017-02-19 14:58:05   By: Anonymous
 
To the MAJORITY of people who voted AGAINST the huckster-in Chief, keep up the good fight. Deny the Imposter -Defy the Imposter!

[Reply ]

    Re: The Majority Will Not Be Silenced
    Posted on: 2017-02-19 15:01:25   By: Anonymous
     
    Trump is a total nut job. Four weeks . He is a joke

    [Reply ]

      Re: The Majority Will Not Be Silenced
      Posted on: 2017-02-19 15:03:12   By: Anonymous
       
      A TOTAL joke! Naïve republicans just cannot see.

      [Reply ]

        Re: The Majority Will Not Be Silenced
        Posted on: 2017-02-19 15:20:05   By: Anonymous
         
        A Joke is usually funny!! Trump is just plane scary!! He needs to be sent to Russia so he can play with his good friend Mr. P.

        [Reply ]

          plane
          Posted on: 2017-02-19 15:50:02   By: Anonymous
           
          Sweet.

          [Reply ]

            Re: plane
            Posted on: 2017-02-20 07:29:23   By: Anonymous
             
            Sour

            [Reply ]

              Re: plane
              Posted on: 2017-02-20 08:03:55   By: Anonymous
               
              Meat.

              [Reply ]

          Re: The Majority Will Not Be Silenced
          Posted on: 2017-02-19 16:24:45   By: Anonymous
           
          You and the rest of your Libs are what's scary.

          [Reply ]

          Re: The Majority Will Not Be Silenced
          Posted on: 2017-02-19 18:51:05   By: Anonymous
           
          WTF is "plane scary"....? Fear of flying, afraid of airports? What is "plane scary" snowflake? HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA CROOKED HILLARY IS GONE FOREVER.

          [Reply ]

      Re: The Majority Will Not Be Silenced
      Posted on: 2017-02-20 08:10:14   By: Anonymous
       
      and the Stock Market is over 20,000 never in the HISTORY of the market has it EVER been this high !
      PRAISE THE LORD, WE HAVE AN HONEST PRESIDENT, AND A FUTURE

      [Reply ]

        Re: The Majority Will Not Be Silenced
        Posted on: 2017-02-20 12:43:44   By: Anonymous
         
        I'd be careful there big fella. It'll go up until it doesn't - and the fall will be quick. Remember last time how many points in a single day. The big numbers are merely the hedge fund boys playing it until they decide not. When's the last time you heard of an everyday kind of person having most of their retirement in Wall Street?

        [Reply ]

HAHAHAHAHAHA!
Posted on: 2017-02-19 16:02:40   By: Anonymous
 
HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA! LYING, CHEATING, CROOKED HILLARY!! HAHAHAHAHAHAHA!

[Reply ]

    Re: HAHAHAHAHAHA!
    Posted on: 2017-02-19 16:58:37   By: Anonymous
     
    "Lying cheating crooked" has never applied to anyone in Washington (or business) more than Trump!
    Yes, the attack and determination will continue until he is gone.

    [Reply ]

      Re: HAHAHAHAHAHA!
      Posted on: 2017-02-19 18:52:12   By: Anonymous
       
      keep crying the blues snowflake...You lose loser. HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA

      [Reply ]

No Subject
Posted on: 2017-02-19 16:59:35   By: Anonymous
 
Quote certainly applies to Tom Brady. Wow, right!?

[Reply ]

Ulysses S. Grant
Posted on: 2017-02-19 17:29:24   By: Anonymous
 
In 2000, Al Gore won the popular vote for the Presidency by roughly 544,000 vote.
Had Al Gore been President, it is highly unlikely that the United States would have had engaged in "Operation Iraqi Freedom" which was the geneses of the Islamic State (aka ISIS).

In 2016, Hillary Clinton won by roughly 2,860,000 votes. In a few years will we reflect upon on how much better off we would have been had she been elected to the highest office in the land?

The Founding Fathers wrestled with the issue of who should have the right to vote. Initially, many believed only land owners should have this right. The 19th amendment, which was ratified in 1920, expanded this right to all women. And it took the Voting Rights Act of 1965 to extend this right to African-Americans.

The vote is a solemn duty that all Americans should honor and fulfill with the greatest of sincerity. Yet, it is not unusual for less than half the populace to exercise this right. Throughout the history of this Great Nation, citizens have spilled precious blood in defense of this right. We should not take it lightly. Yet we did and we got “Trumped on”.

Is it any wonder why some true patriots are up in arms? Please, “Don’t Tread On Me”. We are clearly in the dark hours of this great Nation and, again, to quote the 18th President of the United States of America:

“The friend in my adversity I shall always cherish most. I can better trust those who helped to relieve the gloom of my dark hours than those who are so ready to enjoy with me the sunshine of my prosperity.”




[Reply ]

    Re: Ulysses S. Grant
    Posted on: 2017-02-19 17:42:27   By: Anonymous
     
    W was an idiot in many ways. But Obama allowed ISIS (Thank God we don't have to hear ISIL anymore) the rise when he did not stand his ground for a status of forces agreement and turned tail and ran.



    [Reply ]

No Subject
Posted on: 2017-02-19 17:38:23   By: Anonymous
 
Thanks pinetree for a great quote! How did even this get political?

[Reply ]

    Re:
    Posted on: 2017-02-19 17:52:46   By: Anonymous
     
    My friend, did you read the quote? We are in a battle for the soul of this Great Nation. Both sides are engaged with great fury. May the victory go to Truth, Justice and the American Way.

    [Reply ]

      Re:
      Posted on: 2017-02-19 18:53:47   By: Anonymous
       
      Righto' brother. That would be spelled T-R-U-M-P.

      [Reply ]

        TRUMP IS A DICK HEAD
        Posted on: 2017-02-19 19:10:26   By: Anonymous
         
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        [Reply ]

          Re: TRUMP IS A DICK HEAD
          Posted on: 2017-02-20 05:25:48   By: Anonymous
           
          Oh look another empty head Snow Flake just taking up empty space trying to deny others to read. You really should have been swallowed. .

          [Reply ]

No Subject
Posted on: 2017-02-19 20:50:52   By: Anonymous
 
To the anti trump sore losers/cry babies SMELL MY FINGER IT'S BE WERE THE SUN DOESN"T SHINE! HaHaHa F U

[Reply ]

    I like Trump.
    Posted on: 2017-02-19 22:24:29   By: Anonymous
     
    I think he's just swell.

    [Reply ]

    Re:
    Posted on: 2017-02-22 07:40:20   By: Anonymous
     
    Hey smelly finger guy, are you getting frisky with your mother again?

    [Reply ]

Sjcg123
Posted on: 2017-02-20 01:56:10   By: Anonymous
  Edited By: thepinetree
On: 2017-02-20 08:25:09


[Reply ]

    Re: Sjcg123
    Posted on: 2017-02-20 08:05:32   By: Anonymous
     
    Blue waffle


    [Reply ]

No Subject
Posted on: 2017-02-20 08:13:08   By: Anonymous
 
That's the beauty of language and a quote like this. Either side can read into it. A rallying cry for the Democrats and the GOP believe they have already won.

[Reply ]

    Dump Filled The Swamp
    Posted on: 2017-02-20 10:41:30   By: Anonymous
     
    A Dumper quote-

    I think the truth of the matter is , none of them regardless of party don't want an outsider coming into their sandbox and threatening their gravy train.

    So when Dump picked so many banksters and Billionaires, to fill his cabinet, he was "draining the swamp" ?

    Swamp or sand box, it is filled with Billionaires banksters.

    You Bought Dump's BS You Were Played

    Own It




    [Reply ]


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